Tag Archives: hoodoo

Saving Souls That Were Never Lost

8 Aug

This short poem is a tribute Akan Spirituality. The Akan people are an ethnic group found predominantly in Ghana and the Ivory Coast.

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“Saving Souls That Were Never Lost”
© 2012 Tyrone Turner
All rights reserved.

Onyame is supreme and all-powerful. The creator of us all. Asasse Yaa –Mother Earth provides all that her children need.

The MIGHTY OF MIGHTIES is so grand we must go through spirits, the Abosom. They are all around us in nature. In the wind, rivers, oceans, streams, trees, mountains, rocks and animals. They bless us and protect us. They guide us through difficulties. For instance, Nana Tegare exposes evil doers and liars while Nana Esi Ketewaa protects children. We are all her children. The children of the African Diaspora are watched over by Nana Asuo Gyebi and it is he who helps us remember who we were, who we are and what we are to become.

Our ancestors, the Nsamanfo, are forever watching over us and protecting us. They are to be honored and respected. If we do not know from where we came, we can never understand why we are where we are in the present and how to get to where we want to go in the future. This is called Sankofa — return and get it.

We are not and were never godless people.

Propaganda just made it appear that way. We have a rich history with customs and traditions that are as old as time itself.

Missionaries came from strange lands telling strange tales of their gods and traditions. These gods seem very severe in how they punished their children. In some cases, entire villages were destroyed. Certain men, never women, were said to be able to speak directly with their great god. How odd that is.

There was one story of a woman who gave birth to Awurade. How can that be? A human being that gives birth to the CREATOR? One who is an equal to the ALMIGHTY? That sounds so unnatural.

We were also told that according to their holy book, we are to be servants unto our pale earthly brethren because we were cursed. Many of us were taken to slave fortresses on our shores and taken across the great sea to never be seen again. The atrocities committed against those enslaved and taken to western lands would become infamous.

There are also those who would have us say that there is no god but their god and an illiterate foreigner from the desert is his prophet. We were told that we must accept his beliefs as truth or die. How can their great god be called “the most compassionate” and “the most merciful” when he would sanction the destruction and abandonment of our way of life, our language and customs? How could equality of all men be preached but at the same time carry our young men and women off to slavery in the east?

That does not make sense.

We were told that it was necessary to adopt their ways to avoid the earthly suffering. We were told that those who do not accept their beliefs would be subjected to eternal torment in the hereafter. According to these foreigners, our souls were lost but if we abandoned our “heathen ways,” we would be among those spared and allowed into paradise.

This paradise was said to have golden gates and streets paved with gold. The people there enjoy milk and honey. We already have gold – a lot of it. Milk and honey, though? No thank you. We’ll pass as most of us are lactose intolerant and can’t drink milk.

We lived in peace and did not harm the earth. The earth gave us fruit, vegetables, livestock and gold. We did not even have a word for jail because we never needed one. Our women are equal to our men. As a matter of fact, inheritance and kingship passes through the mother, not the father. If a royal line, a man’s son cannot become king. The son of the king’s sister is heir to the throne.

Hind sight is 20-20 because as soon as they first came to our villages and towns they should have been tossed.

It is a curious thing that they had the audacity to focus on saving souls that were never lost.

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Forces of Nature

22 Jun

Forces of Nature
by Tyrone Turner
Copyright 2011
All rights reserved

This poem is a series of 10 haiku poems that are strung together in a series to tell a story. According to Dictionary.com, a haiku is a major form of Japanese verse, written in 17 syllables divided into 3 lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables, and employing highly evocative allusions and comparisons, often on the subject of nature or one of the seasons; or a poem written in this form. This poem introduces the reader to some gods of Yoruba/Santeria/Voodoo.

Santeria, Yoruba, Voodoo and related religions are very, very misunderstood. It is not, in my opinion, “the Devil’s work.” I’ll leave it at that but I encourage you to do your own research. Personally, I respect people for whatever they may believe – as long as whatever it is that promotes good moral conduct and the brotherhood of man.

This poem has 10 verses – 10 haiku tied together to tell a story/present a message.

Do not be afraid.
It’s not devil stuff.
It’s what’s around us.

Hollywood shows us
scary things. Sacrifices,
murders, and torture.

Olódùmarè
created each one of usl.
All praises are due.

Ellegua is a
trickster, but protects your house.
Divine messenger.

Obatala is
the king of the white cloth. He
creates man and land.

Oshun is the queen
of love, intimacy, wealth,
and diplomacy.

Yemanja. Mother
and protector of children.
She is the ocean.

Changó is the god
of lighting, thunder and fire.
He’s a warrior.

Again, they are us
and we are them. We’re of the
elements of earth.

They are all around
Us. Above, below – all sides.
Forces of nature.